Philosophy: Apology

REMEMBER PLEASE USE QUOTES AND MAKE SURE YOU TELL ME IN THE PAPER WHICH LINE YOU GOT THE QUOTE FROM. AND PLEASE STAY ON THE SUBJECT AND PLEASE PLEASE DONT GET CARRIED AWAY WITH YOUR OPINIONS JUST STICK TO THE QUESTION AND ANSWER IT IN COMPLETE SENTENCES. ALSO, WHEN YOU START WITH THE FIRST QUESTION WHEN YOU WNAT TO ANSWER IT, START OFF WITH THE QUOTE AND ANSWER THE QUESTION DIRECTLY INTO THREE LONG LONG PARAGRAPHS.

HERE ARE THE QUESTIONS:

1. Near the end of his third and final speech, Socrates says "a good man cannot be harmed" (41c-d). Similarly, he earlier says that his accusers cannot harm him at all, for a "better man" cannot "be harmed by a worse" (30d). What does he mean by this, and do you think it is true?

2. In his first speech, Socrates says that "[t]o fear death . . . is no other than to think oneself wise when one is not" (29a). In responding to an imaginary accuser, Socrates says, "’You are wrong, sir, if you think that a man who is any good at all should take into account the risk of life or death; he should look to this only in his actions, whether what he does is just or unjust [translation modified], whether he is acting like a good or a bad man’" (28b-c). How is this rule of action, this ethical injunction, derived from Socrates’ characteristic wisdom, his knowing that he is not wise? What is the relationship between this wisdom and a recognition that death is beyond our understanding?

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