Method Analysis and Critique

 

Method Analysis & critique Guidelines:
– critique ( The Direct method ) in teaching in detail.
Must include:
1- think about the history, general features, and
some questions like “why was the method developed for whom?,”
etc. (just one paragraph)

2- Analyze positive and negative characteristics of the method
(This WILL require additional research outside of the class
readings because the textbooks do not cover Methods in detail.)

3- add what the negative/positive features mean
to you and your (future) class.

4- Describe how the features of the method are relevant to the
effectiveness in a classroom and your lesson.

5- Focus more on the practical perspectives. How will you use
this method when you develop a lesson? You may want to think
about how you can use the strong points to make your lesson
effective. You may also want to think about the ways to minimize
the weaknesses of the method.
1- think about the history, general features, and
some questions like “why was the method developed for whom?,”
etc. (just one paragraph)

2- Analyze positive and negative characteristics of the method
(This WILL require additional research outside of the class
readings because the textbooks do not cover Methods in detail.)

3- add what the negative/positive features mean
to you and your (future) class.

4- Describe how the features of the method are relevant to the
effectiveness in a classroom and your lesson.

5- Focus more on the practical perspectives. How will you use
this method when you develop a lesson? You may want to think
about how you can use the strong points to make your lesson
effective. You may also want to think about the ways to minimize
the weaknesses of the method.

The “naturali_stic”-sirnulating the “natVu/i;al” way in which children learn first
languages-approaches of Gouin and a few of his contemporaries did not take hold
immediately. A generation later, applied linguistics finally established the credibility
of such approaches. Thus it was that at the turn of the century, the Direct Method
became quite widely known and practiced.

The basic premise of the Direct Method was similar to that of Gouin’s Series
Method, namely, that second language learning should be more like first language
learning-lots of oral interaction, spontaneous use of the language, no translation

““between”first and second languages, and little or no analysis of grammatical rules.
Richards and Rodgers (2001 , p. 12) summarized the principles of the Direct Method:
Classroom instruction was conducted exclusively in the target language._
2. Only everyday vocabulary and sentences were taught. ‘ CM
3. Oral communication skills were built up in a carefully traded progression
organized around question-and-answer exchanges between teachers and
students in small, intensive classes.
4. Grammar was taught inductively.
S. New teaching points were taught through modeling and practice.
6. Concrete vocabulary was taught through demonstration, objects, and pictures;
abstract vocabulary was taught by association of ideas.
7. Both speech and listening comprehension were taught.
8. Correct pronunciation and grammar were emphasized.