Anglo-American War of 1812

Anglo-American War of 1812

After the American revolutionary war that brought independence to the nation, Britain still had its troops on American territories on the Northern part around the current boarder of US and Canada. This made the Americans to be irritated. The British were also involved in other activities in which the Americans did not take lightly. For instance they were supporting the Native American Indians to revolt against the American government. They were also in favor of commercial activities that were not benefiting the American people (Taylor, 2010). They unwillingly refused to sign trade agreements with the American government, which were aimed at improving the economy of America. The war was also caused by the ongoing French revolution. During the time it was Britain who was controlling the seas and they made sure that no substantial trade activities happened between any other countries because it blocked goods at the sea.
The US had never experience any major financial crisis before, but in 1819, it experienced a major financial crisis. This is what is commonly known as the panic of 1819. By the time the US became a nation after the end of the revolutionary war, it was facing a depression. This lead to the dollar being established and call for a new constitution. But this did not immediately solve the crisis; because by 1797 it was faced with another panic of depression (Sobel, 1988). These economic down turns during these periods were mainly as a result of the broader Atlantic economy which was also experiencing turmoil. The crisis caused a huge unemployment, closure of many banks and a fall in agriculture. Such indications would definitely lead a nation into a panic (Sobel, 1988).
Many factors contributed to the resurgence of nationalism during the 1820s. these factors include: ideology and shared sentiments, unity among the people of America, and the memories of the revolution war. The constitution also played a role in ensuring nationalistic mindsets and Americans were also of the belief that they were destined for greatness and to rule the world.

The essence of Andrew Jackson policy could be noted from his policies concerning the bank war, Indian removal, the spoil system, and the nullification. Concerning the bank war, he particularly opposed monopolies that the government gave to the banks. He was very much against the banking system because he believed that this system was not beneficial to the common man. He offered solutions that seem not to ever work. His suggestion was that the country should use silver and gold to transact business instead of other forms of money.
His policy on Indian removal saw many regard him as a tyrant. He had ordered that Indians be removed from the Southeast. This was a move to replace the Indians with his supporters who were loyal to him (Benson, 1961). Jackson also displayed tyranny behaviors when he removed everyone in the electoral commission who was not his supporter and replaced them with commissioners who supported him. This was a move to ensure that he won the 1828 election which was very important to him. He used the veto powers to block the moves of his political rivals. He was generally a republican who found rivalry in his party. On the spoil system he encouraged a second party which he considered as a spoiler party to divide his rivals (Benson, 1961).
References
Benson, L. (1961). The Concept of Jacksonian Democracy: New York as a Test Case.
New York: Athenium.
Sobel, R. (1988). Panic on Wall Street: A Classic History of America’s Financial
Disasters. New York: Dutton.
Taylor, A. (2010). The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish
Rebels, & Indian Allies. New York: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.

 

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